Fairy & Cabbage Tree Creeks Catchment Flood Study

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Consultation has concluded

As part of our commitment to managing flood and stormwater in our region, we’re working on a flood study for the Fairy & Cabbage Tree Creeks catchment. The updated Study explains the ways flooding happens in the Fairy & Cabbage Tree Creeks catchment, which covers an area between Towradgi and the southern end of Wollongong.

We’re sharing the draft Study with the community during the public exhibition from 6 April to 11 May 2020.

In line with NSW Health guidelines about Novel Coronavirus, we’ve made some changes to the way we’re engaging the community, to keep our staff and people in our community safe. Instead of having face-to-face conversations with people, we’re offering the following opportunities to learn more about the flood study and ask questions of the floodplain engineers who are working on it:

On this wepbage, you can

In addition, you can email engagement@wollongong.nsw.gov.au to book in a time to speak to a flood engineer about the Study via phone or Skype.

Following our conversations with the community, the Fairy & Cabbage Tree Creeks Flood Study will go to Council for adoption. After that, we can start working on a Floodplain Risk Management Study that looks at what the risks and damages from floods might be, and what we could do to mitigate (reduce) those risks. We’ll again be inviting the community to contribute to that process when the time comes.

Feedback closes on 11 May 2020.

As part of our commitment to managing flood and stormwater in our region, we’re working on a flood study for the Fairy & Cabbage Tree Creeks catchment. The updated Study explains the ways flooding happens in the Fairy & Cabbage Tree Creeks catchment, which covers an area between Towradgi and the southern end of Wollongong.

We’re sharing the draft Study with the community during the public exhibition from 6 April to 11 May 2020.

In line with NSW Health guidelines about Novel Coronavirus, we’ve made some changes to the way we’re engaging the community, to keep our staff and people in our community safe. Instead of having face-to-face conversations with people, we’re offering the following opportunities to learn more about the flood study and ask questions of the floodplain engineers who are working on it:

On this wepbage, you can

In addition, you can email engagement@wollongong.nsw.gov.au to book in a time to speak to a flood engineer about the Study via phone or Skype.

Following our conversations with the community, the Fairy & Cabbage Tree Creeks Flood Study will go to Council for adoption. After that, we can start working on a Floodplain Risk Management Study that looks at what the risks and damages from floods might be, and what we could do to mitigate (reduce) those risks. We’ll again be inviting the community to contribute to that process when the time comes.

Feedback closes on 11 May 2020.

Consultation has concluded
  • Fairy and Cabbage Tree Creeks Flood Study (2020) adopted by Council

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    about 1 month ago

    The Study was made final following the public exhibition and a report went to Council at the meeting on 29 June 2020. All Councillors resolved (decided) to adopt the Study. The Study will inform land use planning, planning certificates and be used for the development of a floodplain risk management study and plan.


    Read the Business Paper and meeting minutes on Council's website for more information.


    Thank you to all made a submission for being part of the conversation. Your contribution to Council's management of flood risk is highly valued.

  • Community input

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    about 2 months ago

    Council staff shared the draft Study with the community and key stakeholders. During the public exhibition period, 6 April to 11 May 2020, letters were sent to more than 16,300 residents and property owners in the catchment area inviting them to learn more and join the conversation. Emails with this information were sent to community, education, Register of Interest (flood), business, government and emergency services’ stakeholders. The information was also available through Council’s Customer Service Centre.

    In line with Australian and NSW Government guidelines for COVID-19, some changes were made to the community engagement approach. Instead of having face-to-face conversations, the following opportunities were offered for people to learn more and provide feedback:

    • A project webpage on www.our.wollongong.nsw.gov.au for people to:
      • Read the FAQ, draft Study and view a Floodplain Risk Management Process diagram to learn more about the Study, how we manage flood risk and what we will use the flood study information for
      • View a video presentation on the flood study report and flood-modelling results
      • View short flood-modelling videos that help explain flood behaviour in the catchment
      • Post questions in an online Q&A, for response by Council flood engineers
      • Provide feedback on the flood study via the online form
    • Phone or Skype video calls for people to talk to a flood engineer
    • Email submissions to the Engagement team

    There were 32 submissions. Five people also posted questions to an online Q&A on the project webpage, which were responded to by Council flood engineers. Feedback themes relating to the flood study focused on the study area, mapping and flood modelling. Expansion of the study area to include the William Street Creek was welcomed. A suggestion was made for improving the resolution of the maps in the draft Study documents that were published on the webpage. It was noted that the flood modelling has good correlation with actual observations.

    Other feedback themes related to Council's floodplain risk management work, flood mitigation, creek and vegetation maintenance, perceived causes of flooding, observations of flooding, requests for flood levels for individual properties, the community engagement approach and a request for pathways along the creeks.